keyboard_arrow_upTransitional generations and the needs of young engineers
keyboard_arrow_downTransitional generations and the needs of young engineers

The South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE) inaugurated its 2015 President, Malcolm Pautz, at the SAICE Presidential Inauguration and Gala Dinner at Emperors Palace in Johannesburg on 12 February 2015. Pautz is the youngest ever president since SAICE’s establishment in 1903.

keyboard_arrow_upEngineers’ Civilution into remote and marginalised areas
keyboard_arrow_downEngineers’ Civilution into remote and marginalised areas

The South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE) inaugurated its 112th president, Stanford Mkhacane, at the SAICE Presidential Inauguration and Gala Dinner at Emperors Palace in Johannesburg on 13 February 2014.

keyboard_arrow_upSAICE condemns corruption
keyboard_arrow_downSAICE condemns corruption

In response to the allegations of collusion, fraud and racketeering against some of the industry’s most prominent civil engineering and construction companies and industry leaders the South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE) emphatically denounces the occurrence or practice of corruption in any form. Should a SAICE member be found guilty of these allegations, the Institution would take appropriate steps.

keyboard_arrow_upExceptional honour for SAICE president
keyboard_arrow_downExceptional honour for SAICE president

The South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE) president, Dr Martin Van Veelen, has been elected as the new president of the Federation of African Engineering Organisations (FAEO). 

keyboard_arrow_upSAICE laments Nazir Alli’s departure from SANRAL
keyboard_arrow_downSAICE laments Nazir Alli’s departure from SANRAL

In a press statement, the South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE) said it laments the resignation of Nazir Alli as CEO of SANRAL. Alli is a longstanding, valued member and Fellow of SAICE. “It is indeed a privilege to salute him for the significant leadership role he has played since 1998 with the establishment of SANRAL, an implementing agency of the Department of Transport,” SAICE said. Alli was also a recipient of the SAICE Transportation Division Chairman’s Award for excellent service to the industry.  “Under Nazir’s leadership a 16 000km road network across South Africa, that can compete with the best in the world, was developed, operated and maintained. In the SAICE Infrastructure Report Card for South Africa 2011 these national roads received a B+ grading, one of only a few infrastructure systems awarded this ‘Fit for the Future’ grade. This is of major importance to our country’s economic growth and development and could only be accomplished because Nazir was a highly competent, motivated and technically sound civil engineering and business manager – a rare combination. It could be said that he was a visionary leader who propelled the civil engineering industry into the 21st century, while working in a complex and very technical environment. 

keyboard_arrow_upCivil engineering experience critical to infrastructure development
keyboard_arrow_downCivil engineering experience critical to infrastructure development

In his inaugural address as the 110th president of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE), Dr Martin van Veelen spoke of the importance of retaining engineering experience – and the wisdom that has grown with it – in government departments responsible for the country’s infrastructure, and equally, of transferring this wisdom and experience to the corps of younger engineers in the public service.  Van Veelen pointed out the shortage of technocrats in those government departments where such skills are essential, highlighting, for example, that in the Department of Water Affairs (DWA) there are only seven engineers in a senior management team of 48 people.

keyboard_arrow_upExcellence in civil engineering
keyboard_arrow_downExcellence in civil engineering

In October the South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE) presented the 2011 SAICE Awards honouring the most outstanding civil engineering projects and people for 2010/2011.  Projects are considered in two prescribed categories: community-based projects and technical excellence projects.  The award for the Most Outstanding Civil Engineering Project Achievement for 2010/2011 in the category for community-based projects was won by the Blackburn Pedestrian Bridge across the N2 highway at Umhlanga in KwaZulu-Natal. The bridge provides a safe route for pedestrians from the Blackburn informal settlement to cross the four-lane highway to the Umhlanga town centre and means that people no longer need to risk their lives in walking along the shoulder of the highway and trying to cross it at road level.  It is a cable-stayed bridge with a two-kilometre concrete walkway. As well as providing 110 local job opportunities, the project embraced a number of community outreach initiatives. These included a bridge-building competition at the Blackburn Primary School, in-service training for two local students and training courses for local labour. The project is a good example of how a holistic approach to engineering can improve the socio-economic conditions of communities living in informal settlements and give people hope.

keyboard_arrow_upFinals of AQUALIBRIUM, the SAICE-TCTA Schools Water Competition 2011
keyboard_arrow_downFinals of AQUALIBRIUM, the SAICE-TCTA Schools Water Competition 2011

The finals of AQUALIBRIUM, the exciting SAICE-TCTA Schools Water Competition 2011 were held at the Sci-Bono Discovery Centre in Newtown, Johannesburg on Friday 29 July 2011. This worthwhile competition never fails to excite the teams, spectators and everybody involved!

keyboard_arrow_upConcerns raised on DPW’s proposed tender moratorium
keyboard_arrow_downConcerns raised on DPW’s proposed tender moratorium

Both the South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE) and Master Builders South Africa (MBSA) have expressed their concern regarding the Minister of Public Works’, Gwen Mahlangu-Nkabinde’s recent announcement of a possible six-month moratorium on departmental tenders. While the minister’s move to improve procurement procedures in the Department of Public Works (DPW) is recognised as a positive step, the concern is that a moratorium on DPW tenders at this stage would affect the building and construction industries detrimentally at all levels – likely leading to a loss of jobs and scarce skills capacity.  Pierre Fourie, CEO of MBSA, said the organisation was taken aback by the minister’s announcement and is currently attempting to assess the potential effect that the proposed moratorium would have on the building sector and members of MBSA. The organisation is concerned too that the minister should have taken such a decision before taking time to consult the building sector and other affected stakeholders.

keyboard_arrow_upThe SAICE Infrastructure Report Card 2011
keyboard_arrow_downThe SAICE Infrastructure Report Card 2011

The SAICE Infrastructure Report Card for South Africa 2011 (IRC), the second of its kind, was released in April by the South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE). It provides a valuable reference for continuing development in the built environment and to focus government’s budgeted infrastructure spend. The IRC 2011 rates the overall condition of our national infrastructure at C-. This it classifies as “satisfactory for now”, although stressed at peak periods and in need of investment in the current medium-term expenditure framework period to avoid serious deficiencies.

keyboard_arrow_upThe Most Outstanding Civil Engineering Project Achievements for 2009/10
keyboard_arrow_downThe Most Outstanding Civil Engineering Project Achievements for 2009/10

Awards for excellence in Civil Engineering On 12 October, 2010 Emperors Palace played host to the 2010 SAICE-Murray & Roberts Steel Awards. The awards cover three categories: technical excellence, community-based and international projects. The technical excellence category attracted a large number of exceptional projects. The civil engineering industry’s huge contribution to infrastructure